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 From the New York Times: Corona risk increases in cold, keep windows open to protect, air-filters and masks needed in office-schools: experts

From the New York Times: Corona risk increases in cold, keep windows open to protect, air-filters and masks needed in office-schools: experts

  • Infections increased due to AC in offices in the summer in the southern states of America, Sikhs found
Researchers in the United States say the risk of corona increases as the cold grows and people begin to gather in one place. In the cold, people prefer to stay at home, office or closed place. The risk of spreading the virus in indoor spaces is high. In the summer in the southern states of America, people were gathering more in AC offices-houses. Now this trend can be seen even in the cold. There are a number of measures that can be taken to prevent this.


1. In indoor places with poor ventilation, the virus stays far away and late

According to Mar, an American doctor who is doing research on the Corona, the risk is higher in places with poor ventilation, such as most restaurants and bars. In such places the virus stays far away and late. This summer, scientists noticed that the virus was spreading from the infected patient inside the hospital as small droplets (aerosols) up to 16 feet in the air.

2. The best solution is to use soap and water instead of all expensive appliances

There are many expensive devices on the market to prevent the spread of the virus indoors. It promises to clean the surface as well as disinfect the air. Experts say that most of these products are overkill and harmless. Atmospheric chemist Dolphin of Colorado State Uni. Says these fancy looking things should be ignored. Water-soap works most beautifully and well.

How to defend in large buildings ...

Joseph Allen, a building safety expert at Harvard, says that just fixing the ventilation doesn't prevent infection. Only with some collective effort can its danger be reduced.

  • Avoid crowds as much as possible, such as encouraging staff to work from home.
  • Only give permit entry to those whose physical presence is required in the building.
  • Install air filters in the building and constantly sanitize the surface.
  • Decide how many people will come in the elevator.
  • Use indoor face covering and other personal protective devices.
  • Use a mask in a closed place.

From the New York Times

 From the New York Times: Corona risk increases in cold, keep windows open to protect, air-filters and masks needed in office-schools: experts

From the New York Times: Corona risk increases in cold, keep windows open to protect, air-filters and masks needed in office-schools: experts

  • Infections increased due to AC in offices in the summer in the southern states of America, Sikhs found
Researchers in the United States say the risk of corona increases as the cold grows and people begin to gather in one place. In the cold, people prefer to stay at home, office or closed place. The risk of spreading the virus in indoor spaces is high. In the summer in the southern states of America, people were gathering more in AC offices-houses. Now this trend can be seen even in the cold. There are a number of measures that can be taken to prevent this.


1. In indoor places with poor ventilation, the virus stays far away and late

According to Mar, an American doctor who is doing research on the Corona, the risk is higher in places with poor ventilation, such as most restaurants and bars. In such places the virus stays far away and late. This summer, scientists noticed that the virus was spreading from the infected patient inside the hospital as small droplets (aerosols) up to 16 feet in the air.

2. The best solution is to use soap and water instead of all expensive appliances

There are many expensive devices on the market to prevent the spread of the virus indoors. It promises to clean the surface as well as disinfect the air. Experts say that most of these products are overkill and harmless. Atmospheric chemist Dolphin of Colorado State Uni. Says these fancy looking things should be ignored. Water-soap works most beautifully and well.

How to defend in large buildings ...

Joseph Allen, a building safety expert at Harvard, says that just fixing the ventilation doesn't prevent infection. Only with some collective effort can its danger be reduced.

  • Avoid crowds as much as possible, such as encouraging staff to work from home.
  • Only give permit entry to those whose physical presence is required in the building.
  • Install air filters in the building and constantly sanitize the surface.
  • Decide how many people will come in the elevator.
  • Use indoor face covering and other personal protective devices.
  • Use a mask in a closed place.

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